Potential changes to short-term housing rental rules under discussion in Plattsburgh – WPTZ

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Plattsburgh officials are considering significant changes to short-term housing regulations, aiming to establish a short-term rental registry that would be subject to the same safety requirements as longer-term rentals within the city.One proposal on the table involves the introduction of a city occupancy tax for short-term rentals, among other potential regulations. The move comes in response to concerns about the growing challenges posed by short-term housing in the area.City Councilor Jeff Moore of Ward 6 expressed support for implementing safety requirements based on complaints received from city residents. Moore highlighted issues such as excessive vehicles, tent setups, and large parties at short-term rental properties. Moore stated, “Some of the complaints that we’ve had include people having a lot of vehicles parked there, setting up tents, having big parties. Some of those things you can’t really regulate, but I think it’s a good attempt at getting that cleared up.”Mayor Chris Rosenquest acknowledged the pressing nature of the short-term housing issue in Plattsburgh. He emphasized that the concerns extend beyond the availability of housing stock to encompass the safety of the properties.Rosenquest stated, “The growing concern is not just the access and the availability of housing stock in the city of Plattsburgh, but there’s a growing concern for the safety of these properties as well.”Councilor Jeff Moore suggested that Plattsburgh should consider adopting a regulatory structure similar to that of Lake Placid for short-term rentals. Lake Placid’s model includes requiring homeowners renting out their properties to guests to complete safety forms.“They’re very strict about what goes on in these places, and I think we need to be too,” Moore added.Lake Placid Mayor Art Devlin shared insights into their successful program, stating, “We started a program where they had to sign their names stating that they did have a list of safety features. Which includes carbon monoxide and smoke detectors and so on.”Devlin emphasized the importance of municipalities learning from each other, encouraging towns and cities in the region to collaborate on establishing proper rules for short-term housing.“That’s how all of us, municipalities, get by is that we have something come up; we look to each other, we see what each other’s doing, and we basically help each other out,” Devlin said.

Plattsburgh officials are considering significant changes to short-term housing regulations, aiming to establish a short-term rental registry that would be subject to the same safety requirements as longer-term rentals within the city.

One proposal on the table involves the introduction of a city occupancy tax for short-term rentals, among other potential regulations. The move comes in response to concerns about the growing challenges posed by short-term housing in the area.

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City Councilor Jeff Moore of Ward 6 expressed support for implementing safety requirements based on complaints received from city residents. Moore highlighted issues such as excessive vehicles, tent setups, and large parties at short-term rental properties.

Moore stated, “Some of the complaints that we’ve had include people having a lot of vehicles parked there, setting up tents, having big parties. Some of those things you can’t really regulate, but I think it’s a good attempt at getting that cleared up.”

Mayor Chris Rosenquest acknowledged the pressing nature of the short-term housing issue in Plattsburgh. He emphasized that the concerns extend beyond the availability of housing stock to encompass the safety of the properties.

Rosenquest stated, “The growing concern is not just the access and the availability of housing stock in the city of Plattsburgh, but there’s a growing concern for the safety of these properties as well.”

Councilor Jeff Moore suggested that Plattsburgh should consider adopting a regulatory structure similar to that of Lake Placid for short-term rentals.

Lake Placid’s model includes requiring homeowners renting out their properties to guests to complete safety forms.

“They’re very strict about what goes on in these places, and I think we need to be too,” Moore added.

Lake Placid Mayor Art Devlin shared insights into their successful program, stating, “We started a program where they had to sign their names stating that they did have a list of safety features. Which includes carbon monoxide and smoke detectors and so on.”

Devlin emphasized the importance of municipalities learning from each other, encouraging towns and cities in the region to collaborate on establishing proper rules for short-term housing.

“That’s how all of us, municipalities, get by is that we have something come up; we look to each other, we see what each other’s doing, and we basically help each other out,” Devlin said.

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